1. danielaugschoell:


Always its not about how you feel, about how shitty or great its going, you have to look at the pictures and see where they lead. You cannot want the pictures to be a certain way or the idea to be what you thought it was going to be, you have to let it unfold and show you what it is. It’s bigger than you, thank God - that’s why its not about you and how miserable you may feel or the lack of faith you may have during a project. It’s about the pictures. You have to be a good self-critic…of the pictures. It takes time to let things go and let things come.

Judith Joy Ross, on How to Start a Project

    danielaugschoell:

    Always its not about how you feel, about how shitty or great its going, you have to look at the pictures and see where they lead. You cannot want the pictures to be a certain way or the idea to be what you thought it was going to be, you have to let it unfold and show you what it is. It’s bigger than you, thank God - that’s why its not about you and how miserable you may feel or the lack of faith you may have during a project. It’s about the pictures. You have to be a good self-critic…of the pictures. It takes time to let things go and let things come.

    Judith Joy Ross, on How to Start a Project

  2. aaroncanipe:

Walker Evans, Connecticut, 1974, Lee Friedlander

    aaroncanipe:

    Walker Evans, Connecticut, 1974, Lee Friedlander

    (Source: mysteriesmanners)

  3. The trailer for the upcoming film Upside Down looks great…it also reminds me a little of artist Tony Thompson’s Double Landscapes….

  4. lbmdispatch:

Todd and Dan. Oakwood Cemetery. Troy, NY
“Uncle Sam’s birthday is coming up and they always have a celebration with all the old soldiers and people like that, so we’re trying to make the place look pretty.”

    lbmdispatch:

    Todd and Dan. Oakwood Cemetery. Troy, NY

    “Uncle Sam’s birthday is coming up and they always have a celebration with all the old soldiers and people like that, so we’re trying to make the place look pretty.”

  5. npr:

nprfreshair:

hwentworth:

Internet’s over, people.  Maurice Sendak just won.

Fresh Air remembers Maurice Sendak

Higher praise there could not be. —Wright

    npr:

    nprfreshair:

    hwentworth:

    Internet’s over, people.  Maurice Sendak just won.

    Fresh Air remembers Maurice Sendak

    Higher praise there could not be. —Wright

  6. ianbrooks:

    Good Fucking Design Advice created by Brian Buirge / Jason Bacher

    “Aims to serve the needs of the greater design community for the common good” is the mission statement of Good Fucking Design Advice. From “Ask for fucking help” to “Don’t fucking procrastinate”, they serve up just generally good fucking advice to live by. Need a more constant fucking reminder? You can grab prints, mugs, or download wallpaper at their website: goodfuckingdesignadvice. Hey look guys, I found a mug that says: “Stay up fucking”. Now THAT’S some fucking good advice.

    (via: whokilledbambi)

  7. jockohomo:

“Alan Belcher has produced new work for this exhibition, a ceramic multiple edition. Known for his pioneering of the “photo-object_ genre (artworks which fused the disciplines of photography and sculpture); he has furthered that exploration with a multiple series of what can be seen as perhaps the ultimate “photo-object”. Belcher has taken the ephemeral nature of the universal jpeg, and solidified its default icon into a standard image surrogate. The edition entitled “______.jpg” was fabricated in China, is a series of 125 pieces each signed and dated.” 25 Years of Talent at Marianne Boesky Gallery, curated by Michelle Grabner May 2 - Jun 16, 2012.

    jockohomo:

    “Alan Belcher has produced new work for this exhibition, a ceramic multiple edition. Known for his pioneering of the “photo-object_ genre (artworks which fused the disciplines of photography and sculpture); he has furthered that exploration with a multiple series of what can be seen as perhaps the ultimate “photo-object”. Belcher has taken the ephemeral nature of the universal jpeg, and solidified its default icon into a standard image surrogate. The edition entitled “______.jpg” was fabricated in China, is a series of 125 pieces each signed and dated.” 25 Years of Talent at Marianne Boesky Gallery, curated by Michelle Grabner May 2 - Jun 16, 2012.

  8. photographyprison:

    Charlie Rose - A conversation with the Beastie Boys (2007)

  9. mullitover:

    This May MULL IT OVER is super pleased to recommend Jamie Stoker for his killer work. Enjoy …

    JONATHAN CHERRY: What gets you up in the morning?

    JAMIE STOKER: Usually heading straight to my gmail to keep on top of any new client developments or enquiries. Once that’s over on to Arseblog and Kotaku for any important developments in the worlds of Arsenal and video games.

    JC: Are there any emerging photographers inspiring you at the moment?

    JS: I see they feature often in this question, but Jody Rogac (for her work which I think contains a certain classicism and slow, considered beauty) and Jake Stangel (for his charisma, enthusiasm and killer work) are two awesome photographers that I love to follow and watch their bright careers develop. Over here in the UK I think Luca Sage, Laura Pannack and Walter Hugo are all making really strong work.

    JC: What is your current project all about?

    JS: Recently I returned to a childhood fascination with cryptozoology (defined as the search for and study of animals whose existence has not yet been proven) and travelled to Loch Ness where I photographed a documentary project about the inhabitants and landscape that form the backdrop to the infamous monster legend. It really is a fascinating story and through the interviews and portraits I took of those tied to the monster I hope one can experience it a little. But the project is also a response to the wider natural majesty of the place and the idea that the world becomes a far more interesting place when there are mysterious question marks left in it.The project is now complete and supported by Small Batch Editions who are printing an edition from the work. I’m also speaking to publishers about the possibility of producing the book I made of the project for a wider audience in 2012 and the long term plan is to continue to explore the world of cyptids (bigfoot is next I think).

    JC: How do you find juggling personal & commercial work?

    JS: To be honest as a recent graduate I’m trying to do and shoot as much as possible in order to successfully make the transition to working freelance and not just sit about reading the internet and playing xbox. What I’ve come to realise is that the busier you are, the more you pour yourself into your own identity and interests as a photographer, the more your personal and commercial work become something unique to yourself, and I think that’s when you really start getting interest and commissions because your craft and images start to stand out.

    JC: Any advice to recent photography graduates?

    JS: Be open minded with your influences and inspiration. There are so many great photographers making supurb work that it can be daunting to pick up your camera and find your own way. Instead let your work flow from all aspects of life,whether it’s an emotion you are feeling or a book you’ve read. I studied history of art before photography and that combined with a love of film has taught me so much about aesthetics, colour and narrative and really informed the look I try to achieve in the colour palette and composition of my own work. When making photographs before I press the shutter I always ask myself “would this work as a strong still from a movie?” and only take the picture if the answer is yes.

    JC: Favourite tree?

    JS: A lone Scots Pine somewhere on a crisp winters morning is usually pretty epic.